Chair of Humanities Data Science and Methodology at TU Darmstadt

Logo

Welcome to the new blog of the Chair of Humanities Data Science and Methodology, (HDSM), part of the Institute of History at the Technische Universität  Darmstadt (TU Darmstadt), Germany. The Chair is led by Prof. Dr. Julianne Nyhan, with the administrative assistance of Frau Nathali Grund. Dr. Nadezhda Povroznik is the Chair’s Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin, with more colleagues to join our team soon.

Here we will post short notices about the wide range of research, supervision, teaching, and knowledge exchange activities that we undertake in HDSM. This blog will draw attention to our activities of the Chair, including our publications, third-party funding bids, seminars, teaching activities, and more. Our current areas of interest may be summarized as follows: the Chair of Humanities Data Science and Methodology studies the affordances and limitations of the application of digital methods to the Humanities. It also seeks to understand more about the social, cultural, intellectual and technical processes and conditions that have shaped the remediation and analysis of Historical and Cultural Heritage sources as data. Areas of particular interest include:

  • Digital Humanities including, but not limited to, the semantic markup, modeling and analysis of historical and lexicographical sources
  • Digital methods for historical research or Digital History
  • The history of Digital Humanities, with particular focus on uncovering ‘hidden’, overlooked or devalued contributions to the field’s emergence and development
  • Oral history and digital methods for oral history
  • Critical Heritage Studies especially its intersections with Digital Cultural Heritage
  • The history of Computing especially in the Humanities
  • Collections as Data
  • The history of information and data
  • Web archives

The intended audience of this blog is the international community of researchers and students in the humanities, digital humanities and data science. As such this blog is crucial to the public presentation of the activities of the Chair, seeking to communicate details about the research and teaching that we do to the outside world and hopefully also allowing us to make new connections through the blog with the wider community of scholars who publish news of their research and teaching on hypothese.org

 

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search